Schumann Novelletten Analysis Essay

Robert Schumann, in full Robert Alexander Schumann, (born June 8, 1810, Zwickau, Saxony [now in Germany]—died July 29, 1856, Endenich, near Bonn, Prussia [Germany]), German Romantic composer renowned particularly for his piano music, songs (lieder), and orchestral music. Many of his best-known piano pieces were written for his wife, the pianist Clara Schumann.

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The early years

Schumann’s father was a bookseller and publisher. After four years at a private school, the boy entered the Zwickau Gymnasium (high school) in 1820 and remained there for eight years. He began his musical education at the age of six, studying the piano. In 1827 he came under the musical influence of the Austrian composer Franz Schubert and the literary influence of the German poet Jean Paul Richter, and in the same year he composed some songs.

In 1828 Schumann left school and, under family pressure, reluctantly entered the University of Leipzig as a law student. But at Leipzig his time was devoted not to the law but to songcomposition, improvisation at the piano, and attempts to write novels. For a few months he studied the piano seriously with a celebrated teacher, Friedrich Wieck, and thus got to know Wieck’s nine-year-old daughter Clara, a brilliant pianist who was just then beginning a successful concert career.

In the summer of 1829 he left Leipzig for Heidelberg. There he composed waltzes in the style of Franz Schubert, afterward used in his piano cycle Papillons (Opus 2; 1829–31), and practiced industriously with a view to abandoning law and becoming a virtuoso pianist—with the result that his mother agreed to allow him to return to Leipzig in October 1830 to study for a trial period with Wieck, who thought highly of his talent but doubted his stability and capacity for hard work.

Schumann’s Opus 1, the Abegg Variations for piano, was published in 1831. An accident to one of the fingers of his right hand, which put an end to his hopes of a career as a virtuoso, was perhaps not an unmitigated misfortune, since it confined him to composition. For Schumann, this was a period of prolific composition in piano pieces, which were published either at once or, in revised forms, later. Among them were the piano cycles Papillons and Carnaval (composed 1833–35) and the Études symphoniques (1834–37; Symphonic Studies), another work consisting of a set of variations. In 1834 Schumann had become engaged to Ernestine von Fricken, but long before the engagement was formally broken off (Jan. 1, 1836) he had fallen in love with the then 16-year-old Clara Wieck. Clara returned his kisses but obeyed her father when he ordered her to break off the relationship. Schumann found himself abandoned for 16 months, during which he wrote the great Fantasy in C Major for piano and edited the Neue Zeitschrift für Musik (New Journal for Music), a periodical that he had helped to found in 1834 and of which he had been editor since early 1835. In 1837 Schumann formally asked Clara’s father for permission to marry her, but Wieck evaded his request. The couple were finally married in 1840 after Schumann had gone to court to set aside Wieck’s legal objection to the marriage.

The mature years

Schumann had by now entered upon one of his most fertile creative periods, producing a series of imaginative works for piano. Among these are the Davidsbündlertänze (composed 1837), Phantasiestücke (1837), Kinderszenen (1838; Scenes from Childhood), Kreisleriana (1838), Arabeske (1838), Humoreske (1838), Novelletten (1838), and Faschingsschwank aus Wien (1839–40; Carnival Jest from Vienna). Schumann wrote most of Faschingsschwank while on a visit to Vienna, during which he unearthed a number of manuscripts by Franz Schubert, including that of the Symphony in C Major (The Great). In 1840 Schumann returned to a field he had neglected for nearly 12 years, that of the solo song; in the space of 11 months (February–December 1840) he composed nearly all the songs on which much of his reputation rests: the cycles Myrthen (Myrtles), the two Liederkreise (Song-Cycles) on texts by Heinrich Heine and Joseph Eichendorff, Dichterliebe (Poet’s Love) and Frauenliebe und Leben (Woman’s Love and Life), and many separate songs.

Clara had been pressing him to widen his scope, to launch out in other media—above all, the orchestra. Now in January–February 1841 he composed the Symphony No. 1 in B-flat Major, which was immediately performed under the composer Felix Mendelssohn at Leipzig; an Overture, Scherzo, and Finale (April–May); a Phantasie for piano and orchestra (May), which was expanded into the famous Piano Concerto in A Minor by the addition of two more movements in 1845; another symphony, in D minor (June–September); and sketches for an uncompleted third symphony, in C minor. After this the orchestral impulse was temporarily spent.

In another new departure, Schumann in 1842 wrote several chamber works, the finest being the Piano Quintet in E-flat Major. The year 1843 was marked by Schumann’s most ambitious work so far, a “secular oratorio,” Das Paradies und die Peri (Paradise and the Peri). He made his debut as a conductor—a role in which he was invariably ineffective—with its first performance in December of that year.

During Schumann’s work on The Peri, the newly founded Leipzig Conservatory had been opened with Mendelssohn as director and Schumann as professor of “piano playing, composition, and playing from score”; again he had embarked on activities for which he was unsuited. The first few months of 1844 were spent on a concert tour of Russia with Clara, which depressed Schumann by making him conscious of his inferior role. On returning to Leipzig he resigned the editorship of the Neue Zeitschrift. In the autumn of 1844 his work was interrupted by a serious nervous collapse. From late 1844 to 1850 he and Clara lived in Dresden, where his health was gradually restored. In 1845 he began another symphony, No. 2 in C Major, but because of aural nerve trouble nearly 10 months passed before the score was finished. Schumann wrote the incidental music to Lord Byron’s drama Manfred in 1848–49.

Schumann’s attempts to obtain posts in Leipzig and Vienna had also been abortive, and in the end he accepted the post of municipal director of music at Düsseldorf. At first things went tolerably well; in 1850–51 he composed the Cello Concerto in A Minor and the Symphony No. 3 in E-flat Major (the Rhenish) and drastically rewrote the 10-year-old Symphony in D Minor, ultimately published as No. 4. He also conducted eight subscription concerts, but his shortcomings as a conductor became obvious, and in 1853 he lost his post as music director at Düsseldorf.

Schumann’s nervous constitution had never been strong. He had contemplated suicide on at least three occasions in the 1830s, and from the mid-1840s on he suffered periodic attacks of severe depression and nervous exhaustion. His musical powers had also declined by the late 1840s, though some of his works still display flashes of his former genius. By 1852 a general deterioration of his nervous system was becoming apparent. On Feb. 10, 1854, Schumann complained of a “very strong and painful” attack of the ear malady that had troubled him before; this was followed by aural hallucinations. On February 26 he asked to be taken to a lunatic asylum, and the next day he attempted suicide by drowning. On March 4 he was removed to a private asylum at Endenich, near Bonn, where he lived for nearly two and a half years, able to correspond for a time with Clara and his friends. He died there in 1856.

Legacy

As a composer Schumann was first and most naturally a miniaturist. Until after his marriage the great bulk of his work—including that by which he is best known—consisted of short piano pieces and songs, two genres so closely related in his case as to be hardly more than two facets of the same. The song accompaniments are often almost self-sufficient piano pieces, and the piano pieces often seem to have been melodically inspired by lyrical poems. Even when the musical idea did not originate in literature but as a waltz, polonaise, or some other striking harmonic progression found at the piano by his improvising fingers, it was usually given a quasi-literary title or brought into relationship with some literary idea.

Much of Schumann’s most characteristic work is introverted and tends to record precise moments and their moods. But another side of his complex personality is evident in the forthright approach and strongly rhythmic patterns of such works as the Toccata (1829–32) and the Piano Quintet. These two aspects are reflected in the two self-projections—the heroically aspiring Florestan and the dreamily introspective Eusebius—into which Schumann analyzed his own character and which he drew upon in an autobiographical novel, his critical writings, and much of his music.

Schumann’s early music—and much of the later—is full of enigmas, musical quotations (usually in subtle disguises), and veiled allusions. In the field of the piano miniature and the pianistic song, he is a supreme master; in the simpler kind of lyrical inspiration and in the invention of musical aphorisms, he has seldom been surpassed. When Schumann embarked on more ambitious composition under Clara’s influence, his success was less assured. He was uncertain in writing for the orchestra and relied too often on safe routine procedures; his string writing was pianistic; and his most characteristic musical ideas, which he had hitherto been content to fit together in mosaics or remold plastically by variation, were seldom suited for development on a large scale. Nor in sustained musical thought did he find a satisfaction comparable with the smaller creations of his private dreamworld. Given such innate limitations, it is astonishing that Schumann was able to construct a symphony as firmly welded as the No. 4 in D Minor or a first movement as organic as that of the SymphonyNo. 3 in E-flat Major, and that he could conceive orchestral music of such gloomy power as the Manfred overture or the penultimate movement of the Symphony No.3. Some of his large-scale works, such as the Piano Concerto and the PianoQuintet, depend overmuch on the piano for their salvation, but the piano certainly saved them. Schumann did manage to create large musical forms that could communicate his own special brand of intimate poetry and unforced nobility.

It was long customary to detect in the works of Schumann’s last years evidence of his approaching collapse. But he had been mentally unstable all his life, haunted by fears of insanity since the age of 18, and the change of style noticeable in the music of the early 1850s—the increasing angularity of his themes and complication of his harmony—may be attributed to other causes, including the influence of J.S. Bach. Schumann was rightly considered an advanced composer in his day, and he stands in the front rank of German Romantic musical figures. Even his critical writing, which is as fantastic, subjective, and lyrical as his early music, constitutes a valuable document of the trend and period.

Gerald E.H. AbrahamThe Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica

Robert Schumann

Biography

Robert Alexander Schumann (1810-1856) was born in Zwickau, Saxony, the fifth and youngest child of the family, on June 8th, 1810. His father, August Schumann, was a bookseller, publisher and novelist and was highly influential in developing young Robert's admiration for literature. In fact, his time was spent almost equally between music and literature. While in school, he studied the German poet-philosophers Friedrich Schiller and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, as well as the English poet Byron, though his greatest literary influence was the German novelist Jean Paul.

At the age of seven, Schumann began studying music with an instructor at the Zwickau high school and it was not long before he tried his hand at composition. Though unprincipled and certainly unskilled in technique, Schumann nevertheless displayed an early talent for capturing emotions in melody and even portraying the dispositions of his friends. However, Schumann's growing aspirations in music were abruptly cut short when his father died when he was 16. Neither his mother or legal guardian took an interest in furthering his musical development and Schumann, like so many musicians before him, resigned to studying law. In 1828, he left home for Leipzig and then for Heidelberg to study law.

In 1830, Schumann abandoned his law studies for music and returned the Leipzig to study under Friedrich Wieck. It was during this time, however, that Schumann injured his right hand, dashing any hopes he had of a career as a concert pianist. He, then, turned his efforts fully upon composition and began studying music theory under Heinrich Dorn, a composer and conductor of the Leipzig opera. Immediately, Schumann began to forge his musical and literary influences. Until 1840, he composed almost exclusively for the piano and many of these works bore strong literary references, among them Papillons, op. 2, a musical portrayal of a masquerade ball in Jean Paul's novel Flegeljahre, and Kreisleriana, based on E.T.A. Hoffman's character Johannes Kreisler.

During these years, Schumann also invented his alter egos, Florestan and Eusebius, most likely influenced by Vult and Valt from Flegeljahre. Florestan was passionate and sometimes brash while Eusebius was dreamy and introspective. In 1831, Schumann published is first criticism, an essay on Chopin's variations on a theme from Mozart's Don Giovanni. In it and in later essays, Schumann discusses his subject from the vantage points of his characters, Florestan and Eusebius. In 1834, he began the Die Neue Zeitschrift für Musik (The New Journal of Music). This journal became the vehicle for Schumann's critical writings and his means of both reviving interest in past composers, such as Mozart and Beethoven, as well as promoting up-and-coming talents.

In 1840, after a long battle with his old teacher, Wieck, Schumann married Wieck's daughter, Clara. The same year also saw Schumann break out into other genres of music. Over 130 songs were composed in 1840 alone and has since come to be known as Schumann's "Year of Song." He quickly then expanded into chamber music, as well as orchestral music effectively taking on the mantle of leading German symphonist left unclaimed after Beethoven.

By 1850, however, Schumann began to show signs of mental breakdown. He continued to compose, though there is much debate over the quality of Schumann's work from his last years. It would seem, though, that there was one great thing left for Schumann to do. On September 30th, 1853, a young, unknown composer by the name of Johannes Brahms knocked unannounced on the Schumann's door carrying nothing but a letter of introduction from the violinist Joseph Joachim and a few of his own compositions. Though Robert was not at home, Brahms returned the next day. Robert and Clara were both astounded by the talents of the young musician and took Brahms into their own home. Schumann, quite to Brahms's dismay, then published an article (his first in many years) titled "Neue Bahnen" ("New Paths") announcing Brahms as the "Chosen One." Though it would be several years before Brahms realized Schumann's expectations of him, Schumann nevertheless launched the career of one of the 19th century's last great masters.

By the following year, Schumann's symptoms worsened. He now believed himself to be hearing the voices of angels and of deceased composers dictating melodies to him. In February of that year, fearing he would cause harm to his wife Clara, he attempted to suicide by throwing himself in the Rhine. He was rescued by boatmen and requested himself that he be put in an asylum for the insane. Schumann remained in an asylum in Bonn until his death on July 29th, 1856.


ComposerTitleDateAction
Robert SchumannSonata No. 1 for Violin and Piano in A minor, Op. 10502/12/2009
Robert SchumannAdagio and Allegro, Op. 7002/27/2009
Robert SchumannTrio No. 1 in d minor, Op. 6301/21/2009
Robert SchumannDrei Stücklein I, From Bunte Blätter Op. 99 (Colored Leaves)01/20/2009
Robert SchumannAlbumblätter II, From Bunte Blätter Op. 99 (Colored Leaves)01/14/2009
Robert SchumannAlbumblätter I, From Bunte Blätter Op. 99 (Colored Leaves)01/19/2009
Robert SchumannNovelette, From Bunte Blätter Op. 99 (Colored Leaves)01/22/2009
Robert SchumannWidmung01/10/2009
Robert SchumannHumoreske, Op. 2001/24/2009
Robert SchumannAdagio and Allegro for Viola and Piano, Op. 7001/17/2009
Robert SchumannThree Romances, Op. 9401/14/2009
Robert SchumannPresto Passionato in g minor, Op. 22a03/11/2010
Robert SchumannIntermezzo from Faschingschwank aus Wein Opus 26 07/09/2010
Robert SchumannTrio No. 2 in F Major for Violin, Cello and Piano, Op. 8008/12/2010
Robert SchumannVariations on a Nocturne by Chopin10/22/2010
Robert SchumannKinderszenen, Op. 1503/09/2010
Robert SchumannTräumerei (Dreaming), from Kinderszenen Op.15 02/03/2009
Robert SchumannAdagio and Allegro for Viola and Piano, Op. 7001/11/2009
Robert SchumannAdagio and Allegro, Op. 7001/25/2009
Robert SchumannAdagio and Allegro for Viola and Piano, Op. 7010/29/2010
Robert SchumannArabesque in C Major, Op. 1807/27/2010
Robert SchumannArabesque in C Major, Op. 1801/09/2009
Robert SchumannArabesque in C Major, Op. 1802/24/2009
Robert SchumannVariations on the name “Abegg,” Op. 101/09/2009
Robert SchumannVariations on the name “Abegg,” Op. 101/26/2009
Robert SchumannPapillons in C-sharp Major, Op. 204/22/2009
Robert SchumannCarnaval, Op. 901/17/2009
Robert SchumannKreisleriana Op. 1609/09/2010
Robert SchumannFantasy Pieces Op. 73 01/27/2010
Robert SchumannFantasy Pieces Op. 73 08/10/2010
Robert SchumannDu bist wie eine Blume, Op. 25, No. 2405/02/2009
Robert SchumannDer Nussbaum, Op 25, No. 305/02/2009
Robert SchumannIm wunderschönen Monat Mai, from Dichterlieber 03/24/2009
Robert SchumannAus Meinen Tranen Spriessen, from Dichterlieber03/24/2009
Robert SchumannSymphonic Etudes, Op.1301/25/2009
Robert SchumannSymphonic Etudes, Op.13 (excerpts)08/30/2009
Robert SchumannToccata in C Major, Op. 701/26/2009
Robert SchumannToccata in C Major, Op. 702/03/2009
Robert SchumannToccata in C Major, Op. 703/15/2009
Robert SchumannFaschingsschwank aus Wien, Op. 26 (Carnival of Vienna)01/24/2009
Robert SchumannFaschingsschwank aus Wien, Op. 26 (Carnival of Vienna)03/16/2009
Robert SchumannSonata No. 1 for Violin and Piano in A minor, Op. 10501/16/2009
Robert SchumannSonata No. 1 for Violin and Piano in A minor, Op. 10501/10/2009
Robert SchumannSonata No. 1 for Violin and Piano in A minor, Op. 10503/16/2010
Robert SchumannMarchenbilder for viola and piano, Op. 11301/14/2009
Robert SchumannMarchenbilder for viola and piano, Op. 11310/16/2009
Robert SchumannMärchenerzählungen (Fairy Tales) Op. 132 for Clarinet, Viola and Piano01/21/2009
Robert SchumannPiano Sonata, Op.1107/28/2010
Robert SchumannLiebeslied, Op. 51, No. 505/02/2009
Robert SchumannWidmung, Op. 25, No. 105/02/2009
Robert SchumannMärchenerzählungen (Fairy tales), Op. 13201/20/2009
Robert SchumannDie Beiden Grenadiere03/21/2009
Robert SchumannSeit ich ihn gesehen habe11/05/2010
Robert SchumannIch kann's nicht fassen, nicht glauben11/06/2010
Robert SchumannDu Ring an meinem Finger11/06/2010
Robert SchumannSüßer Freund, du blickest mich verwundert an11/06/2010
Robert SchumannAn meinem Herzen, an meiner Brust11/06/2010
Robert SchumannNun hast du mir den ersten Schmerz getan11/06/2010
Robert SchumannRomance in F-sharp Major, Op. 28, No. 201/27/2009
Robert SchumannRomance in F-sharp Major, Op. 28, No. 212/24/2010
Robert SchumannFantasie in C Major for Violin and Piano, Op. 13102/12/2009
Robert SchumannAdagio and Allegro, Op. 7001/07/2011
Robert SchumannAllegro in B minor, Op. 801/08/2009
Robert SchumannSix Etudes after Paganini Caprices, Set 1 Op.3 02/03/2009
Robert SchumannRöselein, Röselein!, Op. 89, No. 605/02/2009
Robert SchumannFantasy Pieces Op. 73 01/14/2011
Robert SchumannMaerchenbilder for viola and piano - I mov, op.11301/23/2011
Robert SchumannMaerchenbilder for viola and piano - II mov, op.11301/23/2011
Robert SchumannMaerchenbilder for viola and piano - III mov, op.11301/23/2011
Robert SchumannMaerchenbilder for viola and piano - IV mov, op.11301/23/2011
Robert SchumannArabesque in C Major Op. 1803/09/2011
Robert SchumannString Quartet No.1 in a minor, Op. 41, No. 103/11/2011
Robert SchumannMaerchenbilder for viola and piano, op.11303/13/2011
Robert SchumannDer Kontrabandiste11/04/2009
Robert SchumannArabesque in C Major, Op. 1803/21/2011
Robert SchumannArabesque in C Major, Op. 1803/22/2011
Robert SchumannMärchenerzählungen - I mov03/27/2011
Robert SchumannMärchenerzählungen - II mov03/27/2011
Robert SchumannMärchenerzählungen - III mov03/27/2011
Robert SchumannQuintetto, op.44 - III mov03/27/2011
Robert SchumannMärchenerzählungen - IV mov03/27/2011
Robert SchumannQuintetto, op.44 - IV mov03/27/2011
Robert SchumannQuintetto, op.44 - II mov03/27/2011
Robert SchumannQuintetto, op.44 - I mov03/27/2011
Robert SchumannWenn Ich in deinene Augen seh' (from Dichterliebe)03/27/2011
Robert SchumannIm Rhein, In heiligen Strome (from Dichterliebe)03/27/2011
Robert SchumannUnd wüßten's die Blumen, die kleinen (from Dichterliebe)03/27/2011
Robert SchumannEin Jüngling liebt ein Mädchen (from Dichterliebe)03/27/2011
Robert SchumannIch hab' im Traum geweinet (from Dichterliebe)03/27/2011
Robert SchumannArabesque in C Major, Op. 1804/06/2011
Robert SchumannDavidsbündlertänze, Op. 6 04/08/2011
Robert SchumannDritte Sonate für Klavier und Violine op. post.06/12/2011
Robert SchumannEinfach, innig, from Three Romances, Op. 2206/30/2011
Robert SchumannNicht schnel (I), from Three Romances, Op. 2206/30/2011
Robert SchumannNicht schnell (III), from Three Romances, Op. 2206/30/2011
Robert SchumannThree Romances, Op. 2206/30/2011
Robert SchumannPaganini Etude Op.3 No.408/03/2011
Robert Schumann5 Stücke im Volkston for Cello and Piano, Op. 10210/03/2011
Robert SchumannSymphonic Etudes Op 13 (Heinrich Neuhaus - A lecture)10/11/2011
Robert Schumann5 Stücke im Volkston for Cello and Piano, Op. 10207/07/2010
Robert Schumann5 Stücke im Volkston for Cello and Piano, Op. 10210/19/2011
Robert SchumannString Quartet No.1 in a minor, Op. 41, No. 110/19/2011
Robert SchumannPiano Concerto in A Minor, Op. 54 10/26/2011
Robert SchumannSeit ich ihn gesehen, from Frauenliebe und -leben, Op. 4210/27/2011
Robert SchumannDu Ring an meinem Finger, from Frauenliebe und -leben, Op. 4210/27/2011
Robert SchumannLiebeslied, Op. 51, No. 510/27/2011
Robert SchumannDie Beiden Grenadiere, Op. 49, No. 110/27/2011
Robert SchumannKinderszenen, Op. 1511/04/2011
Robert SchumannAwfschwung (Fantasiestücke Op. 12)12/01/2011
Robert SchumannPaganini Etude op.3 n.412/10/2011
Robert SchumannPaganini Etude op.3 n.612/10/2011
Robert Schumann Paganini Etude op.3 n.112/10/2011
Robert SchumannSonatina op.118 n.212/10/2011
Robert Schumann Toccata op.712/10/2011
Robert SchumannPiano Quintet in E-flat Major, Op. 4412/07/2011
Robert SchumannFantasy Pieces Op. 73 12/15/2011
Robert SchumannMarchenbilder for viola and piano, Op. 11312/20/2011
Robert SchumannSymphonic Etudes, Op.1310/11/2011
Robert SchumannIm Volkston, from Bilder aus Osten, Op. 6612/21/2011
Robert SchumannBilder aus Osten, Op. 6612/21/2011
Robert SchumannLebhaft, from Bilder aus Osten, Op. 6612/21/2011
Robert SchumannLebhaft, from Bilder aus Osten, Op. 6612/21/2011
Robert SchumannNicht schnell und sehr gesangvoll zu spielen, from Bilder aus Osten, Op. 6612/21/2011
Robert SchumannNicht schnell, from Bilder aus Osten, Op. 6612/21/2011
Robert SchumannReuig, andächtig, from Bilder aus Osten, Op. 6612/21/2011
Robert SchumannPiano Trio no.1 in d minor, Op. 63 01/30/2012
Robert SchumannNovellette no. 6 in A Major: Sehr lebhaft mit vielem Humor, from Novelletten, Op. 2102/11/2012
Robert SchumannNovellette No. 5 in D Major: Rauschend und festlich, from Novelletten, Op. 2102/11/2012
Robert SchumannNovellette no. 4 in D Major: Ballmäßig. Sehr munter, from Novelletten, Op. 2102/11/2012
Robert SchumannNovellette no. 1 in F Major: Markiert und kräftig, from Novelletten, Op. 2102/11/2012
Robert SchumannArabesque in C Major, Op. 1803/27/2012
Robert SchumannFantasy Pieces Op. 73 03/29/2012
Robert SchumannSonata No. 1 for Violin and Piano in A minor, Op. 10504/16/2012
Robert Schumann5 Stücke im Volkston for Cello and Piano, Op. 10205/04/2012
Robert SchumannWaldszenen (Forest Scenes), Op. 8206/23/2012
Robert SchumannArabesque in C Major, Op. 1806/28/2012
Robert SchumannRomance in F-sharp Major, Op. 28, No. 207/04/2012
Robert SchumannÉtudes Symphoniques, Op. 13 - Part I 07/11/2012
Robert SchumannÉtudes Symphoniques, Op. 13 - Part II 07/11/2012
Robert SchumannPiano Quintet in E-flat Major, Op. 4409/07/2012
Robert SchumannPiano Quintet in E-flat Major, Op. 4409/08/2011
Robert SchumannZart und mit Ausdruck, from Fantasy Pieces Op. 73 09/23/2012
Robert SchumannLebhaft, leicht, from Fantasy Pieces Op. 7309/23/2012
Robert SchumannRasch und mit Feuer, from Fantasy Pieces Op. 7309/23/2012
Robert SchumannFantasy Pieces Op. 73 09/23/2012
Robert SchumannKreisleriana Op. 1610/05/2012
Robert SchumannÉtudes Symphoniques, Op. 1311/02/2012
Robert SchumannPiano Trio no.1 in d minor, Op. 63 11/20/2012
Robert SchumannKreisleriana Op. 1612/06/2012
Robert SchumannAdagio and Allegro, Op. 7012/13/2012
Robert SchumannPiano Quartet in E flat major, op. 4701/09/2011
Robert SchumannPiano Quartet in E flat major, op. 4710/13/2011
Robert SchumannPiano Quartet in E flat major, op. 4710/24/2012
Robert SchumannPiano Quartet in E flat major, op. 4709/22/2012
Robert SchumannPiano Quartet op.47 I Part01/07/2011
Robert SchumannPiano Quartet op.47 II Part01/07/2011
Robert SchumannPiano Quartet op.47 III Part01/07/2011
Robert SchumannPiano Quartet op.47 IV Part01/07/2011
Robert SchumannErstes Grün, from Zwölf Gedichte von Justinus Kerner Op. 35, No. 409/26/2011
Robert SchumannNachtstuke op. 23 n.3 e 404/05/2012
Robert SchumannSehnsucht nach der Waldgegend, from Zwölf Gedichte von Justinus Kerner Op. 35, No. 509/26/2011
Robert SchumannWanderung, from Zwölf Gedichte von Justinus Kerner Op. 35, No. 709/26/2011
Robert SchumannFrühlingsnacht, from Liederkreis, Op. 3910/27/2011
Robert SchumannIntermezzo, Op. 74, No. 210/27/2011

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