Example Designer Cover Letter

Graphic designer cover letter

View this sample cover letter for graphic design, or download the graphic design cover letter template in Word.

Graphic designers know the power of creative storytelling. To be considered for top graphic designer jobs, your cover letter must demonstrate your skills and experience, as well as your passion for design. For writing tips, view this sample cover letter for a graphic designer, or download the graphic designer cover letter template in Word. 

Additionally, you can learn about creative design careers and look for graphic design jobs on Monster.

Graphic designer cover letter template

MARY J. SAMPSON
Sometown, NY 55555 | (555) 555-5555 | ms@somedomain.com | Portfolio URL


Graphic designer translating concepts into impactful, branded designs
Digital Media - Websites - Video - Print - Packaging - Merchandising - Catalogs - Retail Graphics


August 10, 2017
Mr. Michael Preston
Human Resources Director
ABC Corporation
55 Madison Ave.
Sometown, NY 55555

Re: Graphic Designer, Advertised on Monster

Dear Mr. Preston:

It might seem strange that I get excited thinking about colors, typography and cascading style sheets, but my passion for all aspects of graphic design has remained strong throughout my 10-year career. I am very interested in the graphic designer position posted on Monster, and hope to have the chance to interview for this exciting opportunity.

My background includes corporate, agency and freelance graphic design experience, with a history of leading print, interactive and digital design projects to acclaimed completion. I have worked on nationwide and international marketing, advertising, product launch and image campaigns for global brands and companies, including DEF Co, GHI Co, JKL Co, MNO Co and PQR Co, as well as a host of startup and mid-size businesses.

Highlights of my skills include:

  • Print and Digital Graphic Design
  • Website, UX and GUI Design
  • Packaging Design
  • Flash Animation and 3D Art
  • Brand Creation and Extension
  • Interactive Media and Typography Design
  • Clickable Prototypes and Information Architecture
  • Pre-Press and Printing Processes
  • Original Artwork and Photorealistic Illustration
  • Color Rendering and Correction

I am backed by a BA in graphic design and proficiencies in Adobe Creative Suite, HTML, HTML5, CSS, WordPress and a range of other design, video, web, wireframe and multimedia software.

Dedicated to bringing brands to life through omni-channel marketing programs, my key focus is to exceed client and employer expectations. I enjoy collaborating with clients, creative teams and production professionals to deliver design solutions propelling web traffic, social media engagement, response rates and customer-acquisition results.

You may visit my portfolio at Portfolio URL to see examples of my work, and call me at (555) 555-5555 to set up an interview. Thank you.

Sincerely,

 

Mary J. Sampson
Enclosure: Resume


See all sample cover letters on Monster. 


How to Write the Best Graphic Design Cover Letter

If you want the job at the best graphic design firm ever, you have to submit the best cover letter, resume and portfolio ever. (We’ll leave the bits about being a worthy designer to another post.)

And with no shortage of resources on what makes a great cover letter, resume and portfolio out there, this should be a somewhat simple feat. But here at Go Media, we are disappointed to see the same mistakes made over and over again. It often seems like applicants choose to apply for more jobs – the quantity – over quality (in other words, doing a thorough job of applying to fewer companies). In this three part series, we talk about the elements in cover letters, resumes and portfolios that really make our jaws drop.

To start, we’d like to address cover letters. Above all, there is one element that most good applicants touch upon, but often do not take the time to cover with enough depth and passion. This aspect makes all the difference between a cover letter worth passing by, and one worth paying attention to.

What is this magic element?

A SECTION THAT SERIOUSLY PLAYS TO OUR EGO.

Sounds simple, right? Far from it.
It takes time and a ton of time, which is why we rarely see it. Please read on!

In the cover letter, it’s critical that you communicate to the potential employer: “You are the only company I am applying for, I’ve been following your company for years.” You want to play into the ego of the company. In order to communicate this you need a plausible story. Most importantly, you need more FACTS about the company you’re applying to. So, this means research! Referencing a few portfolio items is a fine start, but anyone can do that in 10 seconds.

If you REALLY want to wow the potential employer, spend several days (even weeks if necessary) reading anything you can get your hands on about them. This may sound like a huge investment, but consider this – you’re about to commit to working there for YEARS. Isn’t a week of research worth getting into the right company?

If they wrote a book – read it. If they have a blog, read every article you can on the history of the company. About page? Read it. Then, write a concise ‘How I got to know your company’ story… If you can find any gem in your research to reference you can say things like: “I read in your book that you used to lay on the floor drawing with crayons all day as a kid. That’s exactly how I spent my childhood.”

Basically, you need to make sure they know you KNOW them… you did your research. You desperately want to work for them and them only. Sprinkling in a few obscure facts will help communicate this.

As an employer it’s VERY clear to us who’s done their research and who is just throwing out a generic cover letter. Pandering to our ego works. We want to think that the people I’m hiring are HUGE Go Media fans! Of course! We love hearing their stories about how they discovered our company and have been following us for years. When they reference specific tutorials we wrote 8 years ago, we think: “Wow. This is going to be a loyal employee!”

Similarly, continue to blow us out of the water if you’re able to illustrate actionable ways in which you’ve shown your love for the company. Have you volunteered for our design conference, benefit shows, or attended every single one of our open houses? Let us know!

Also, Answer the why

Next, explain WHY you want to work for the company you’re applying to. The reason should be specific. Something like: “Your firm has a background in illustration and I can see that you appreciate art. This is unique compared to the other firms I’ve considered applying to. I love the balance of artistry with design – it’s something I’ve always done. It’s important to me that I’m working in an environment that has that appreciation for the artistic side of design.” Again, you are not only giving the reason why, but you’re reinforcing that you have a deep knowledge of the company you’re applying to. This ties everything together eloquently while making us feel warm and fuzzy.

While you’re at it, here are things to avoid doing in your cover letter:

  • Not addressing anyone specifically. Never write “Dear Hiring manager” or “To whom it may concern”. Do your research! Figure out who’s hiring and write to them specifically!
  • Sending before having trusted friends and family proofread it again and again. Watch your spelling! Attention to details is critical. One error here can knock you out of the game completely.
  • Using your email as the cover letter itself. Design a cover letter that you save along with your resume and attach. It’s ok if what you write in your email is exactly the same as the attached pdf. The point is – I want to see you apply the same branding from your resume onto a cover letter page, and then again on the website. If you don’t attach a designed cover letter you’re losing that opportunity.
  • Praising your own design skills, i.e. “I’m a VERY talented designer.” This simply comes across as arrogant. Whether you are talented or not will show up in your portfolio. Saying you’re good ONLY WORKS AGAINST YOU. If you want to praise yourself in any way – it should be: “I work hard, I’m eager to learn and I have a positive attitude.” These are things that cannot be seen in a portfolio. And these ARE traits that a potential employer is looking for – not arrogance or overconfidence.
  • Giving your potential employer work. Saying things like: “To download my resume go here…” is very bad. Make hiring you as simple as possible. I recommend attaching a finished designed cover letter (which may contain the same text that you included in the e-mail), your resume and a pdf of your portfolio and or a link to an online portfolio.
  • Saying you want this job as a jumping off point for completely different. The last thing we want to hear is that you’re applying to be a Junior Designer, only to turn into a Project Manager in another 6 months. We will support your hopes and dreams, but we are looking to fill the position of a Junior Designer now. If you’re actually looking for a Project Management position, please look elsewhere.

Okay, now that we’ve covered our number one must follow rule and these important don’ts, promise us you’ll dedicate the time your cover letter (and future employer) deserves.

Graphic designers can get an instant remote access to their essential graphic designing software such as Adobe Illustrator and any more on their remotely accessible virtual PCs from CloudDesktopOnline.com with 24*7 commendable technical support from Apps4Rent.

Stay tuned, when next week we’ll be back with our favorite rules about creating the best design resume ever >
Please Avoid Making these Mistakes We Often See on Design Resumes

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